The Vegetable Harvest

This was going to be so easy.  Just plop a few pictures and and BAM! there’s a great post about this year’s vegetable harvest!  Not so fast turbo, it took hours to sort through all the images from the garden this year.  We have a tendency to take a few too many pictures.

Molly:  It took me all week to go through the pictures and make the decision if the photo stays or goes.  It was a lot of pressure.

Mike:  That was a lot of pressure?  I think you may want to go back to work so you can remember what intense pressure really feels like.

Molly:  I know, I know!  When I have more time and fewer projects I can get a little bit finicky.  Building someone’s dream home within budget and time constraints seems so simple from this distance.

Mike:  Hmmm,….

Molly:  And really I wouldn’t be talkin’, mister calling the kettle black.  You were freaking out over the fact you hadn’t rearranged the freezer!

Mike:  We have a cow (dead) coming in a week- we gotta make room or there’s going to be a lot of beef for dinner!

Molly:  Hmmm,….

The amount of work Mike put into installing our new gardens this spring was tremendous.  We were both burning to expand our garden this year.   As usual things got a little out of hand.  We spent the winter planning the new beds knowing that Mike would be out of work early Spring.

He planned out our gardens using an online service called Vegetable Garden Planner:

Garden Plan

Mike: I liked this software.  It’s easy to use to draw out your beds and then you just drag what you want to plant where.  Since I used the square foot method things got confusing fast.  This helped me keep track.  The program also has nice features like being able to customize varieties of plants and remembering what you planted in the past so that you can rotate crops appropriately.

Transforming from winter….

….to spring.

The winds were fierce and the temperature drops tremendous.  We had a late freeze (like the last day of May) that typically would have forced us to start all over.  This year with all the raised beds either covered in glass or plastic they had the protection they needed to keep our tender babies alive.

It was our first year of starting plants inside from seed.  Mike made some seed stations and our living room turned into a mini green house.  We have limited space so every available surface became a place to put a heat pad and a flat of seeds.

Molly:  I had such a time trying to get any of my flowers to germinate.  I must of planted over a hundred seeds to get about 20 plants!

Mike:  It did feel like a real hit or miss operation.  Some plants germinated with such ease while others simply wouldn’t get going.  Still, we had quite a few starts ready for transplanting.


By mid July we could see all of our hard work paying off.  Memories of the winds, seeds not germinating and young plants dying were becoming a distant memory.

Oh, and then the food starts coming in…

Molly:  Mike, give the readers a low-down on what this all means.  You know, how much food did we get?  It’s your turn to show off your fancy garden software and all!

Mike: There is still a bunch of stuff in the ground; potatoes, beets, carrots and more but I did track our yields on a number of plants.

Molly:  I remember, you kept making me weigh everything I picked Mr. Anal Scientist Wannabe.

Mike:  Sorry,  I wanted the data.  I’ll let it go next year.  Anyhow, here’s some of the yields we got this year’s vegetable harvest: 

Tomatoes: 57 lbs- with tons of green ones on the vine and frost coming this weekend

Spinach: 11 lbs

Zucchini: 98 lbs- From one plant!!  We pulled it a couple weeks ago ’cause we coudn’t take it anymore

Green Beans: 20 lbs from 8 plants

Swiss Chard: 26 lbs-  It’s amazing that 5 plants worth of greens could add up to so much

Cucumbers: 29 lbs

The garden is slowing down (thank goodness).  Mike planted some winter greens in one of the beds and covered it with glass.  We had our first freeze last night.  Garden, oh garden, we will miss you but sleep well because come next year….EXPANSION BABY!

What did you, dear reader, grow in your garden this year?

Here’s a few recent posts on gardening we like:

101 Centavos

Cheap Vegetable Gardener

Giant Veggie Gardener

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7 Comments

  1. Posted October 7, 2011 at 7:40 pm | Permalink

    Amazing yields, guys. And, you’ve done it with a very short season. I think a CSA is not too far off in your future.
    Oh, thanks for the link, by the way.

    • Posted October 8, 2011 at 7:34 am | Permalink

      It’s amazing how just one hour south the growing season expands by a month!
      Last night we spent the evening out in the wet cold rain pulling all the green tomatoes. Fall has descended on us!

  2. Posted October 8, 2011 at 8:27 am | Permalink

    Wow – you guys had an amazing year.  We didn’t plant a thing this year.  I missed the harvest but not a summer long of weeding… 

    • Posted October 10, 2011 at 6:56 am | Permalink

      First year I didn’t have a ton of weeding to do!

  3. Craig
    Posted October 8, 2011 at 9:29 am | Permalink

    Given your high-altitude, dry climate, and relatively short growing season, you guys have done fabulously well!

    Craig

    • Posted October 10, 2011 at 7:07 am | Permalink

      Thanks! I didn’t think it was such a short season but yeah, four months is a pretty tight window. The more gardening I do the more respect I gain for subsistence farming. If we were depending on our ‘crops’ to live on we”d be deciding who to eat come February.

  4. Natalie
    Posted October 8, 2011 at 11:08 am | Permalink

    Chris and I got to eat some of that amazing food from the garden! Lots of hard work (I know, I saw it being dug out) but what a beautiful yield.

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  1. […] and Molly have harvested hundreds of pounds of produce from their garden. What to do with 98 pounds of zucchini out the ears?  Click and find […]

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