Homemade Ravioli

Last week I showed you all how I made my own ravioli press.  Molly’s childhood friend requested we share how we made the lobster ravioli  for Pistol’s birthday.  It only made sense!

Ravioli are one of those foods that are much cheaper to make at home than to buy from the store.  Plus there is no substitute for fresh, so unless you live near an Italian market this is the way to go.

First, you must start with the dough:

Ravioli dough

Ravioli dough

My recipe is adapted from Tyler Florence’s pasta dough recipe on the food network site.

Pasta Dough for Ravioli |Tyler Florence

Inactive Prep Time: 30 min
Serves: enough for 48 large ravioli  

Ingredients:

  • 5 cups/700g all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
  • Can substitute up to 1 1/2 cup semolina flour  210g/490g (Semolina adds flavor and ‘bite’ but makes the dough harder to work)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 6 large eggs
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 cup water *if using semolina which needs a lot of moisture

Directions:

  1. In an electric mixer bowl combine the flour and salt w/ a whisk.
  2. Make a crater in the flour and add eggs and water.
  3. Beat in w/ whisk until too thick then mix w/ hands
  4. Add oil,  mix more turn out and knead until ball sticks together.
  5. Knead 5 mins at 2 w/ machine or 10 mins by hand.
  6. Wrap the dough in plastic bag; let rest from 30 mins – overnight to relax gluten.
  7. break off chunks of 150g
  8. Roll through machine down to #2 setting.
  9. Lay out sheet of dough on ravioli press
  10. Pipe in filling
  11. Use egg wash to glue together.
  12. Lay second sheet of dough on top.
  13. Roll over press with a rolling pin to seal and cut ravioli.
  14. lay out finished raviolis on a  floured or cornmealed baking sheet then freeze or cook

On pasta machines: Just get it! It’s $30 well spent. I debated for years before I finally bought one. I can’t roll dough out by hand nearly as well and cutting spaghetti strands with a knife? Fu-gedaBoutit!

We use the pasta machine to roll out cracker dough and dumpling wrappers too.

Dumpling making ravioli

Doesn't Dumpling look excited to help out?!

No! No! Don't drink the raw eggs!

No! No! Don't drink the raw eggs!

Lesson learned!

Lesson learned!

Mike and Dumpling filling the ravioli

Mike and Dumpling filling the ravioli

Spinach and cheese filling

Spinach and cheese filling

Rolling on the top layer

Rolling on the top layer

Ready to be boiled or frozen

Ready to be boiled or frozen

Lobster Ravioli Filling

Ingredients:

  • 3 lobster tails
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 5 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 onion chopped coarsely
  • 1 stalk celery, chopped coarsely
  • 1 carrot, chopped coarsely
  • 6 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1/4 cup cognac (white wine would work too)
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions:

  1. Cut the lobster tails in half lengthwise; make sure to collect the juices that will run out. Remove the meat and set aside.  Chop up the shells coarsely.
  2. Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Saute the lobster tails until just cooked through then remove and set aside.
  3. Melt 2 tablespoons butter in the pan and add the chopped lobster shells and their juices, the  onion, celery, carrots, 1/2 the thyme, and the tomato paste. Cook until the shells are red and the vegetables are soft, about 10 to 15 minutes.
  4. Add the cognac. Bring to a boil and let the alcohol evaporate off. Add water to just cover and stir up all the browned bits on the bottom of the pot with a wooden spoon. Add the cream, bring to a boil then immediately decrease the heat and let it simmer.
  5. Start a roux with the remaining 3 tbs of butter & the flour in another sauce pan.  Melt the butter over medium high heat and then sprinkle in the flour.
  6. Stir the roux as it cooks until the flour starts to brown (light tan color is fine).
  7. Strain the the vegetables and shells from the creamy broth.
  8. Add the broth into the roux adding a little at a time and stirring it in.  Let it simmer for 15 minutes.
  9. Dice the lobster tails into small pieces and add at the end.
  10. Season with salt and pepper if needed.  Refrigerate.
  11. The filling will be the consistency of a paste once it has cooled.  Spoon into a small plastic bag, cut off a corner and pipe into the raviolis.

Here’s a bonus!

Spinach filling

Ingredients:

  • 10 ounces spinach, cleaned and trimmed
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup ricotta cheese, preferably fresh, drained for a few minutes in a fine strainer
  • 1 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

Directions:

  1. Plunge the spinach into boiling salted water; remove it 30 seconds later. Drain, cool, and chop finely.
  2. Combine the spinach with the egg, ricotta cheese, Parmesan cheese, pepper, and nutmeg. Spoon into each ravioli.

Ravioli making is quite the process and always takes several hours. We like to make a bunch and freeze them. It’s always a good day when you don’t know what to make for dinner and you find a bag of ravioli in the freezer!

This post is part of the  Hearth-n-Soul blog hop. Click on the badge to see all the other participants for this week’s blog hop!  

Hearth-n-Soul Blog Hop

What?  You can’t get enough of us?  Well do we have options for you!

 You can subscribe to Mike and Molly’s House through our RSS feed or email.

You can also follow our Facebook Fanpage , join us on Twitter, see what we are up to on Google + and see what cool stuff we follow on Pinterest.  

 Like what you see here?  Spread the word to your friends and family!

Thanks!!!!

 

15 Comments

  1. Posted January 24, 2012 at 8:16 am | Permalink

    thanks for the inspiration!

  2. Jeff @ Sustainable Life Blog
    Posted January 24, 2012 at 9:50 am | Permalink

    Thanks for there recipe! THat looks really tasty! 

  3. Posted January 24, 2012 at 12:33 pm | Permalink

    I thought pasta machines were expensive so I never paid attention to them. But now I make udon sometimes at home and am thinking about making fresh pasta, too. My next kitchen gadget will be a pasta machine (or a pressure cooker – I just spent 6 hours steaming soy beans in bamboo steamers instead of a pressure cooker that can do the job in 15 minutes!!!)! BTW, Tyler Florence’s recipe is always good!

    • Posted January 26, 2012 at 6:48 am | Permalink

      Corey you listening to this?   I’m sure a birthday is coming up soon….

    • Posted January 26, 2012 at 6:51 am | Permalink

      Corey you listening to this?   I’m sure a birthday is coming up soon….

      I just got a bamboo steamer last weekend we’re going to have a char sui bao extravaganza soon.

    • Posted January 26, 2012 at 6:54 am | Permalink

      Corey you listening to this?   I’m sure a birthday is coming up soon….

      I tried pulled noodles this week- no luck…yet.   Ran the dough through the pasta machine and still had great ramen.  

      I just got a bamboo steamer last weekend. We’re going to have another char sui bao extravaganza soon.

  4. Nino
    Posted January 24, 2012 at 9:20 pm | Permalink

    Looks great and tastes great too!

  5. Posted January 25, 2012 at 3:03 am | Permalink

    Okay, I’m saving this one. In the summer, we dive for Lobsters on the coast of cape cod, so It’ll be a good use for our catch.  And thanks for sharing your dough recipe.

    • Posted January 26, 2012 at 6:47 am | Permalink

      Awww, I want to dive for lobster!  Sounds so cool.  Lobster used to be so plentiful in the 18th & 19th century that servants would put a clause in their contracts that they wouldn’t have to eat lobster more than four times a week.  They were also used as prison food!

      If your dough is still too stiff add more water just to the point of sticky.

  6. Jprewitt6
    Posted January 25, 2012 at 6:26 pm | Permalink

    could you just sell it to us.  It looks wonderful, but it seems like a real process

  7. Sandy
    Posted January 26, 2012 at 7:12 am | Permalink

    I just read the recipe again and I realized that you put the tail shells IN the filling. Doesn’t that make it crunchy? I didn’t know you cooked the shells. I’m totally confused.

  8. Sandy
    Posted January 26, 2012 at 7:13 am | Permalink

    I just read the recipe again and I realized that you put the tail shells IN the filling. Doesn’t that make it crunchy? I didn’t know you cooked the shells. I’m totally confused.

    • Posted January 26, 2012 at 7:59 am | Permalink

      I jammed a bunch of process into step 6 and it wasn’t clear.

      Yes, you cook the shells in the broth- they add a lot of flavor.

      No they are not in the final filling. They get strained out before the broth gets added to the roux.

      I reworked the recipe so hopefully it’s more clear. Thanks for pointing that out!

    • Sandy
      Posted January 26, 2012 at 8:09 am | Permalink

      Never mind. Finally saw the step that said to STRAIN the liquid to get rid of the shells. I don’t know why I can’t see these words the first time I read the recipe.

      I think I’m gonna try this recipe now.

  9. Alea Milham
    Posted January 30, 2012 at 10:27 am | Permalink

    I am excited about trying this! I’ve wanted to make my own ravioli for some time, but hadn’t researched how to do it yet. Thanks for sharing this great tutorial with the HnS Hop.

One Trackback

  1. [...] Homemade Ravioli - I’ve wanted to learn how to do this so I can make gluten-free ravioli, so I bookmark this as a resource. [...]

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>